Mews IV

Parts I, II, and III.

I may not have said it before, but I wanted to have the front of the hawk room be mostly windows so I could get away with weathering the bird outside less than if the windows were small.   I decided to have an “open” and a “not-so-open” window.  The “not-so-open” window was made with vertical 2″x6″ boards spaced 3/4″ apart.  This will allow some light and air flow, but is relatively concealed if the hawk wants to hide.  The “open” window is made with schedule 40 1/2″ PVC pipes spaced 3/4″ apart.  The 3/4″ spacing is the largest recommended by The Modern Apprentice for small birds such as a kestrel or merlin.  If you only plan on flying a red tail or other medium to large birds 1.5″ is fine.  I’d like to eventually fly a kestrel or Cooper’s hawk, so went with the smaller spacing.

IMAG2759

Unlike the 2x4s that stuck out the back the PVC fit entirely into the car. It just had to touch the windshield to do so.

The PVC was a bit flimsy by itself and I worried about it breaking under the strain of a red tail crashing into them.  I added the crossbeam to strengthen the pipes.  It seems to have worked well.

IMAG2773

Detail of the PVC window during construction. Screws were driven through each pipe and the top, center, and bottom to make them more secure. I’m hoping this doesn’t weaken the structural integrity too much.

IMAG2776

All the pipes in place. They pass through the crossbeam in the middle

After the panels were build I carried them into the back yard.  I’m stubborn and didn’t ask for help doing this.  I was sore for a couple days after – the panels are pretty hefty, especially pieces with extra 2x4s such as the door and window panels.

IMAG2811

Most of the panels laid out in the yard waiting to be assembled.

I did get some help installing one panel.  We had Josh, a guy from church who is going to watch out dogs in a few weeks, over for dinner and I co-opted while the steaks were cooking.  I needed the help with the panel too, it was the only one that I couldn’t hold both panels and drill or tighten a bolt.

IMAG2831

I don’t own a ladder so I used a bucket. This will have to change before I put the roof on.

IMAG2835

Josh stood on the bucket behidn the mews so I was left reaching for the bolt as he tightened it.

IMAG2834

The first set of panels assembled.

IMAG2838

More panels assembled

IMAG2865

The roof panels were screwed to 2×4’s bolted to the inside of the walls. I didn’t want to screw them directly to the walls so it’s easier to disassemble.

IMAG2864

Mews with a partial roof

IMAG2867

Finished mews

IMAG2869
Finished mews, right side
IMAG2868

Mews, left side

All in all the mews cost:

Number            Item                                                                           Price

    115                   8′ 2×4                                                                      $350.06

    4                     8′ 2×6                                                                       $18.76

     6                    8′ 4×4                                                                       $43.02

    12                     3/8″ 4×8′ plywood                                              $193.32

     3                     15/32″ 4×8″                                                            $55.11

     12 lbs               3″ and 2.5″ wood screws                                     $74.58

     29                   3/8″x5″ bolt                                                           $121.03

     25                  3/8″x6″ bolt                                                            $18.97

      8                   3/8″x8″ bolt                                                             $7.74

     69                   3/8″ Hex nuts                                                         $7.68

     100                  3/8″ washers                                                          $18.84

     15                   10′ schedule 40 1/2″ PVC pipe                            $26.40

     2                     Window bolt (for doors)                                      $5.92

     3                    Utility door handles                                               $9.84

     4                    Door hinge                                                               $10.32

     1                     Locking door clasp                                                 $7.29

     5 gallons white paint, paint roller, brush, paint tray            $87.71

     1 gallon white paint                                                                      $10.97

              TOTAL                                                                                            $1060.27

The actual cost is just a bit lower than this as I bought way too many washers and have some bolts left over.  Additionally, longer scraps of 2×4 have been used to build a perch.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Falconry

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s